Ingestible robots, glasses-free 3-D, and computers that explain themselves

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Ingestible robots, glasses-free 3-D, and computers that explain themselves
16 December 2016, 10:35 pm

Machines that predict the future, robots that patch wounds, and wireless emotion-detectors are just a few of the exciting projects that came out of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) this year. Here’s a sampling of 16 highlights from 2016 that span the many computer science disciplines that make up CSAIL.

Robots for exploring Mars — and your stomach

  • A team led by CSAIL director Daniela Rus developed an ingestible origami robot that unfolds in the stomach to patch wounds and remove swallowed batteries.
  • Researchers are working on NASA’s humanoid robot, “Valkyrie,” who will be programmed for trips into outer space and to autonomously perform tasks.
  • A 3-D printed robot was made of both solids and liquids and printed in one single step, with no assembly required.
 Keeping data safe and secure

  • CSAIL hosted a cyber summit that convened members of academia, industry, and government, including featured speakers Admiral Michael Rogers, director of the National Security Agency; and Andrew McCabe, deputy director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
  • Researchers came up with a system for staying anonymous online that uses less bandwidth to transfer large files between anonymous users.
  • A deep-learning system called AI2 was shown to be able to predict 85 percent of cyberattacks with the help of some human input.
Advancements in computer vision

  • A new imaging technique called Interactive Dynamic Video lets you reach in and “touch” objects in videos using a normal camera.
  • Researchers from CSAIL and Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science produced a movie display called Cinema 3D that uses special lenses and mirrors to allow viewers to watch 3-D movies in a theater without having to wear those clunky 3-D glasses.
  • A new deep-learning algorithm can predict human interactions more accurately than ever before, by training itself on footage from TV shows like "Desperate Housewives" and "The Office."
  • A group from MIT and Harvard University developed an algorithm that may help astronomers produce the first image of a black hole, stitching together telescope data to essentially turn the planet into one large telescope dish.
Tech to help with health

  • A team produced a robot that can help schedule and assign tasks by learning from humans, in fields like medicine and the military.
  • Researchers came up with an algorithm for identifying organs in fetal MRI scans to extensively evaluate prenatal health.
  • A wireless device called EQ-Radio can tell if you’re excited, happy, angry, or sad, by measuring breathing and heart rhythms.
Algorithms, systems and networks


Source: MIT News - CSAIL - Robotics - Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) - Robots - Artificial intelligence

Reprinted with permission of MIT News : MIT News homepage