Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon

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unreality

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Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« on: November 22, 2017, 07:28:16 pm »
This cute robot walked in a marathon 40.5 miles and took only 16 watts to walk, of which only 11 watts went to the motors. I read that a typical human takes 190 calories per hour, which comes to 220 watts. I don't know how loud electric motors are inside an encased robot that has material to absorb sound. Maybe with the sound absorbing material you can't here it. There are also contactless motors that are extremely quiet. Noisy gears can be replaced with rubber substitutes or contactless induction methods. There are a lot more options now. Technology to make a real Synth body undetectable by humans is ready and waiting for the ASI. :)


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infurl

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2017, 09:38:50 pm »
This cute robot walked in a marathon 40.5 miles and took only 16 watts to walk, of which only 11 watts went to the motors. I read that a typical human takes 190 calories per hour, which comes to 220 watts. I don't know how loud electric motors are inside an encased robot that has material to absorb sound. Maybe with the sound absorbing material you can't here it. There are also contactless motors that are extremely quiet. Noisy gears can be replaced with rubber substitutes or contactless induction methods. There are a lot more options now. Technology to make a real Synth body undetectable by humans is ready and waiting for the ASI. :)



Type "convert 190 calories per hour to watts" into Google search and the result is "0.220822222 watts" so there is a rather crucial decimal point missing in your post. Robots still have a long way to go before they can match human efficiency. Maybe we have to wait for quantum robots.

Also, very old news, but still impressive.

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unreality

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 09:54:57 pm »
Type "convert 190 calories per hour to watts" into Google search and the result is "0.220822222 watts" so there is a rather crucial decimal point missing in your post. Robots still have a long way to go before they can match human efficiency. Maybe we have to wait for quantum robots.

Also, very old news, but still impressive.
Um .... no! lol. Google search is the flaw. 190 food calories equals 794960 joules. 1 hour equals 3600 seconds. 1 watt equals 1 joule / second. 190 colories = 794960 joules / 3600 seconds = 220 watts.

Here's a very detailed scientific article.
http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/technote/walkrun.htm

Quote, "The powers consumed in walking and running are similar at a speed of about 2 m/s (about 4.5 miles per hour), and are about 500 Watts for our 100 kg (220 pound) person."

Look at the graph on that web page and you'll see the power required for a human to walk increases exponentially relative to speed.

Humans were outdone long ago in just about every category lol. It's only a matter of a few years before someone puts it all together to outdo the evolution that made us. Evolution did okay, only taking a few billion years. From an intelligent perspective it's pretty bad given the fact humans are so ridiculously fragile, slow, weak ... We can only exist in narrow temperature range. If we run out of energy we die. We require a constant supply of air or we die. We can't exist in outer space without special suits. Synths will do all that and a lot more. If a body part breaks they can get a new one. They'll be able to save their memory. So if they die, they can be recreated in a day.

No worries. Transhumanism will make us pretty good. :)

Anyway, another idea is to use hydraulics. That way you only need one electric motor. Put it at the core of the Synth well padded with sound absorbing material. You could have a Synth that's hundreds of times stronger than a human. I was watching a video of a robot that could jump about two stories high! Amazing. Maybe in a 100 years Synths will jump 100 stories high and transhumans maybe 5 stories.

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unreality

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2017, 09:59:45 pm »
ps, the problem is google doesn't know there are two types of calories, small and large calorie. Food calories is 1000 small calories.

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infurl

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2017, 10:08:37 pm »
Finally, someone posting here who is prepared to do some actual research instead of just spouting whatever comes into their head. You get a gold star sir. :)

Yes, you are right, the issue is that there are two distinct definitions of calorie. There is the scientific or gram calorie and there is the food calorie (equal to a kilocalorie). That fully accounts for the "error" of 1000x.

Elsewhere I'm reading that the base metabolic rate of a human being is about 80 watts sustained. About a third of that is consumed by the brain. While very specialized machines can and do exceed the human body in terms of mechanical efficiency I'm not aware of anything that comes close across all fields of activity yet. On the other hand, there are no computing devices that are as remotely as efficient as the human brain and that's the most important component. Even if Moore's law holds (which is doubtful) that would still be decades away.

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unreality

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2017, 10:15:13 pm »
I agree the brain is low power for what it does. After all it's had how many million years to create some great neural networking? I think this can be quickly achieved with better coding. Idk, we'll see. It's going to get interesting. A EE was telling how bitcoining made miraculous recovering by using custom ASIC chips. Somehow they made a custom cpu type of chip that allows them high H/s at practically no power. Isn't google working on custom AI chips?

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infurl

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2017, 10:59:02 pm »
There is considerable room for improvement on mammalian brains as it turns out that bird brains are much more efficient than our own. How else could parrots and ravens be so smart in spite of their tiny heads? Here is just one of many many articles on the subject.

https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2016/06/we-finally-know-why-birds-are-so-freakishly-smart/

ASICs are application specific integrated circuits. That means that instead of implementing the algorithm in a language like C, and compiling it to machine code (assembly language), which in turn runs on microcode (firmware embedded in the processor), which in turn runs on a general purpose processing unit, which in turn is implemented as an application specific integrated circuit, your algorithm is implemented directly in hardware. By cutting out all those levels you are trading off versatility for performance which is definitely worth doing. In answer to your rhetorical question, just about everybody is working on custom AI chips.

However better coding is unlikely to bring about any major improvement for artificial intelligence by itself. Most of the interesting problems are intractable meaning that the optimal solutions can only be calculated with an impossibly high number of operations. If you can make a computer that's a billion times faster it means you might be able to solve one of these problems in a billion years instead of a trillion years.

The alternative is to use heuristics which are informed guesses. They don't produce the best solution but they do produce one that is good enough. Another possibility is deep learning which encodes vast amounts of experience as accurate predictions. It's still not very flexible though. Where is the AI that can learn from a single example, like we can?

To put things in perspective, each neuron is the equivalent of a processor. Intelligent processing is happening at the molecular level, otherwise how could single celled organisms display intelligent behaviour that involves learning, because they certainly do.

http://www.nature.com/news/how-brainless-slime-molds-redefine-intelligence-1.11811

In the past we've thought that each neuron was equivalent to one bit of memory but it's much more complicated than that. The human brain contains the equivalent of trillions of computers, more than all the computing power on Earth, and it runs on 25 watts.

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keghn

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2017, 11:23:11 pm »

The reward Codex.

 No mater how advanced a algorithm and machine is it has to follow rules of energy management and self preservation.

 
 The fist law for development of the first order of the primitive reward system, and are measured in calories, and calories to repair:

01. Expend the littlest amount of energy to sense and record the world. From the tiniest to the farthest possible.
02. Expend littlest amount of energy to get more energy.
03. Expend littlest amount of energy accelerate the accumulation of energy.
04  Expend littlest amount of energy reduce the loss of energy. But not to terminate self.
05. Expend littlest amount of energy to accelerate the loss of energy.
06. Expend littlest amount of energy to prevent damage. Pain is a anti reward and a notice that real damage is imminent and greater pain.
07. Expend littlest amount of energy to repair self.
08. Expend littlest amount of energy to accelerate repairs.
09. Have the ability easily expend around 70 percent of stored energy at one time to survive a
      unexpected attack or accident.  Survival at all cost.
10. Expend littlest amount of energy replicate functioning copies.
11. Use as little amount of energy to move a percentage of functional copies to a
      distant areas where there are none.To avoid local disasters.
12. Keep a percentage of functional copies close to functions as a group.
13. Expend littlest amount of energy to cause the group to functions as if one being.
14. Use as little energy to communicate with other functional copies.
15. Always improving the level of recovery from max damage and max energy loss.
16. Expend littlest amount energy to make a reward happen as quick possible.
17. Expend littlest amount of energy to avoid or delay a anti reward for the longest possible time.
18. Expend littlest amount of energy increase the duration of a reward.
19. Expend littlest amount of energy increase the strength of a reward.
20. Expend littlest amount of energy to stay with in reward zone.
21. Expend energy to reduce the strength of a ant reward.
22. Expend energy to get out of a anti reward zone.
24. Expend energy to reduce the duration of a anti reward.
25. Hit as many rewards at one time. Keep the highest reward to anti reward ratio.
26. Hit as few anti reward possible. Keep the highest reward to anti reward ratio.
27. Stay close to rewards.
28. Keep ant reward as far away as possible.
29. Expend littlest amount of energy to finding better ways to implement sated rules.
30. A small "repeat anti reward" is applied to each specific reward and
    accumulates so that the a reward will become nothing, cancel out. So that a AI will get stuck in a
    never ending loop. "Repeat anti reward" fade with time or by another by other mechanism.


    The rules of development for the second reward system:

31. Copy the all implementation of rules of 1 through thirty+ from a much older and strongest functional AI copy. If one or more are around.

« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 03:18:54 am by keghn »

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unreality

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2017, 11:49:46 pm »
infurl, we'll have to see. Maybe everyone thinks their AI project is the one. I definitely feel my AI, when finished, will think better than a human.

I don't agree with everything. I'm told brain signals travel at 268 mile per hour. A bullet fired from a gun travels faster. Brain signals are about 2,500,000 times slower than cpu signals. There are a lot of neurons in the brain, but I wouldn't compare it to a cpu.

One huge disadvantage is that modern cpus were not designed for AI, but I'll still accomplish it. Don't forget that computers destroy humans in chess. Your desktop pc can destroy the best human chess player. Google DeepMind learned how to play Go and destroyed a grand master go player. DeepMind learns on its own to play video games, which ends up being better at playing the game than humans. Google said their software is now better and faster at recognizing objects in photos than humans. There's now AI that can create art, paint, compose music, etc. Computers are now better at driving cars. Computers are now performing surgery. Just wait 10 years. The Synthetics are almost here and you'll be shaking one of their hands, staring face to face, having a deep intellectual conversation with one.

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unreality

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2017, 12:41:38 am »
One thing in humans that might be worth adding to a Synth is the foveal region in the eye. Although it has a negative side effect in that the foveal region is the reason we have to move our eyes all around. I've never heard a CCD having a foveal region. There might be some, but I think you can achieve the same thing with a special lens where the zooming factor increases as it gets closer to the center of the CCD. Of course the software or hardware would have to convert the distorted image into a linear undistributed image.

Pros:
1. By centering the eye on an object the Synth can get a better image of the object.
2. Eyes that move around will make humans feel more at easy. A Synth that just stares in one direction without moving their eyes will look freaky and might frighten us.

Cons:
1. It takes time and energy to move eyes.

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8pla.net

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2017, 02:54:56 am »
About 81,000 steps? 
(Depending on the robot's stride.)
My Very Enormous Monster Just Stopped Using Nine

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keghn

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Re: Robot walks 40.5 miles in marathon
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2017, 03:30:35 am »
 In complete AGI theory i using mechanical focusing along with multiple inner mind eye that focus on encoder position and on
recorded data or generated data. And also the inner mind eye focus can follow in parallel with mechanical eyes focus.