The Emotional Machine

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Kappers

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The Emotional Machine
« on: August 06, 2011, 04:41:17 pm »
Although I'm new to Artificial Intelligence, through my research I have been reading increasing quantities about the deployment of emotional devices in machines. The concept of machines bearing emotion is by some length impossible, yet the ability for machines to emulate some features of emotion may open endless doors to technological advance in robots, media and home computing! And it could potentially bring along a few useful traits to expert systems  :-\ ....

I will not go into detail as I intend to release my dissertation once complete, however I was wondering your opinions as matured artificial intelligence enthusiasts?  :)

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DaveMorton

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2011, 08:44:21 pm »
I think that, especially in the area of conversational agents (AKA chat bots), emotions, or at least the illusion of emotions, should and will play an important role in their evolution. I myself have also contemplated the creation of a simple "emotion engine", based on an ontology database (probably WordNet), that would alter certain "emotional states", which would then be analyzed to alter the agent's "mood", and thus, it's reactions to any given input. And this is from a former Auto Mechanic, turned "Granny Nanny". :P So I can imagine that somewhere, something similar, but far more advanced is being explored.
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lrh9

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2011, 01:02:05 am »
I am ambivalent on most points involving robots and emotion.

I tend to think of things in terms of their practical application. I've been thinking about what software might exist in the future, and I think I'd like a program that could "read" a book and generate images or a movie and sounds so it would be possible to "watch" the book. Think "Peter Jackson on a CD."

I'd imagine the software would have to deal with emotion in order to convincingly present the emotions of the characters.

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Kappers

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2011, 11:37:34 am »
Regardless of boosting our "affective experience" with our home computers and our simple toy problems, consider the industrial scale, and the roles emotion could play in expert systems for example!

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Data

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2011, 01:15:35 pm »
To have emotions or not to have emotions that is the question.

This is how I see it, only an opinion.

First should come an intelligent, thinking machine, something like to a mathematical calculator but one that can calculate words as well as math.

There is no need for a calculator to have emotions, it's a machine, just give me the answer ASAP because I'm working and time is of the essence.

Example:
Machine tell me, if I walk at a constant 4.2 miles per hour how long would it take me to reach Nelsons Column from Buckingham Palace?

No need for emotions just understand the words their meanings and calculate the answer.

OK I can understand the need for emotions in a chatbot but I feel that technology is a has been, we want more than simple chitchat. (Well I do)

This video kind of explains what I mean, the toaster has emotions that just get in the way, yeah funny for a little while but really I just want toast. 

Sorry about the advert.



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Kappers

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2011, 04:34:29 pm »
First should come an intelligent, thinking machine, something like to a mathematical calculator but one that can calculate words as well as math.

There is no need for a calculator to have emotions, it's a machine, just give me the answer ASAP because I'm working and time is of the essence.


Creating an emotional machine may mean creating a machine which presents human traits associated with emotion, it is obviously a situation benefit and would only be utilized where it fits. For example, when simplifying decision making in expert systems through a form of tenacity and bias, or it can be used to aid people with autism in social situation through use of a wearable which can evaluate the emotional states of people they talk to.

By creating an emotional device, I do not particularly mean creating a device which can act with free will and then behave irrationally due to the influence of emotion. I instead mean creating devices which simulate some emotional mechanisms associated with us humans, there is argument to say creating a perfect emotional device would be impossible anyway.

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Art

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2011, 08:35:42 pm »
Regardless of boosting our "affective experience" with our home computers and our simple toy problems, consider the industrial scale, and the roles emotion could play in expert systems for example!

I'd have to agree with Datahopa. Most expert systems are geared primarily toward answering or relaying knowledge about a particular subject. These systems provide answers to people in a somewhat direct way (ie. just the correct answer and not a lot of pleasantries nor emotions) which is primarily what people want.

I'm not saying that under certain conditions a weighted group of words or perhaps keywords could trigger an emotional branch in the program which would allow it to deviate or even display a simulated emotion to the user. The zabaware chatbot, UltraHal allows its avatar / character to display an emotional response if threated, insulted, cursed or otherwise mistreated. The character's face will definitely reflect the mood for the moment so adding pseudo-emotions to an artificial entity is certainly possible. For practical applications other than a companion chatbot or assistant, the particular application or usage of the AI based system would have to be measured and adjusted for the requirements or wishes of the purchaser, leasee or user depending on the circumstances.

I don't really need to be greeted by an emotional (other than just being pleasant) bot at a kiosk when asking information, directions, etc.

Imagine your auto's GPS...after giving turn-by-turn directions for many miles it finally has an emotional breakdown because it feels like it has been taken for granted.

What about an advanced AI that with it's emotional chip / programming, falls in love with it's owner? Emotions? You haven't seen nothing yet until you've seen and experienced serious digital emotions!! (That's what I've been told...as I don't actually know first hand. ::))

Brings to mind this funny commercial somewhat illustrating the AI emotion point. Excuse the AD...


In the world of AI, it's the thought that counts!

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Kappers

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2011, 08:52:43 pm »
I don't think you understand my point, if something is emotional, it will not make it a piece of lippy and friendly machinery which wants to potentially become your friend or shun you... If something can simulate emotion, or at least accurately judge it through simple techniques such as analyzing voice intonation or using facial recognition algorithm, then although it may arguably not be described as an "emotional" machine, it would have enough insight into the user's emotional state to operate suitably. Control over it's actions is inevitably possible in this current state and time of technical advance. For example it may be used to analyse a users responsiveness to dynamic video game content, lets say in a horror game, and then in order to maximize their gaming experience it may provide sudden shocks when it can measure fear in the user. But in terms of if a device was as emotional as you suggested, we can't forget the rational traits which follow suit...

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victorshulist

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2011, 04:17:36 pm »
First should come an intelligent, thinking machine, something like to a mathematical calculator but one that can calculate words as well as math.
There is no need for a calculator to have emotions, it's a machine, just give me the answer ASAP because I'm working and time is of the essence.

I couldn't agree more.    Give me Mr. Data !  They can keep Lore  ;D

I can't think of any good justification for emotional machines.    Mr. Data is a very polite, useful, knowledgeable android... good enough for me!

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ethanhunt

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2011, 05:58:19 pm »
hi

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Kappers

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2011, 08:46:57 pm »

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Data

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2011, 11:36:23 am »
@ Kappers, I just wanted to say that I agree with your point that it would be beneficial for Ai to be able to read peoples emotions, I can see that being of use in certain circumstances, as you have pointed out. 




I couldn't agree more.    Give me Mr. Data !  They can keep Lore  ;D


LOL, that's exactly what I mean  :)

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ivanv

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2011, 09:04:28 pm »
what if someone in the future, makes an android and plants in this algorithm:

1. locate human
2. find out his weakest mental point
3. make him ashamed
4. destroy his will for living
and finally
5. fill his mind with (any suggestions?)

can incredible smart machine that understands emotions, be able to do such thing?
is there such a man that would want to have this treatment?

 :P human:
don't look at me, i'm as good as flower. at least now i am. i think. or maby i'm not. or maybe i'm mean. oh, crap, i am. i'm a mean person. please somebody help me. anyone, please? please?
 ^-^ machine:
hey You! yes, You right there. You're perfect. don't You dare to change anything. ever. You are a valuable person. don't You ever forget that... now go in peace, You're sure a good person.

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DaveMorton

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #13 on: August 31, 2011, 09:13:25 pm »
An Electronic Messiah? Somehow I find that far more frightening than Skynet.  :o :'( :-\
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Art

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Re: The Emotional Machine
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2011, 11:23:05 pm »
Well, speaking from experience, the first five items on your list are basically what the
various branches of the US military do during your first days and weeks of orientation.

They tear you down, and make you forget all the civilian nonsense, peer pressure, etc.,
then through rigorous exercise and challenging obstacles, build you back up in they
manner that will best serve them and eventually you. You now have self confidence and
can push your limits to see what you're made of.

Difference is, the military doesn't embellish praise and accolades like your bot would,
but they realize that inside of you, there is now a different and in most cases, a better
individual than the one that first came to them.

Of course an android can't join or experience the military but the parallels of principles
could certainly be tried.
Interesting!

In the world of AI, it's the thought that counts!