Home made logic

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ranch vermin

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Home made logic
« on: June 05, 2015, 08:46:29 am »
Heres hardware. And being a programmer is HARDER than being a shitty little electronics engineer - IF! One of those dickheads could even teach anything, because they DONT understand anything! So
how can they teach it??

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiBUOSQDZ44&feature=youtu.be

say i have 2 wires connected to their negative terminal to a wire each.
Then i connect these wires to another wire to a battery connected to its positive terminal.

First I notice 9v dc going through, with my voltmetre, because 2 negative terminals, connecting only to only 1 positive terminal, will only draw the same volts from both, because it only has the potential difference given by the positive terminal on the other side, but will draw it from both batteries at once, This way, I go through twice as much outputs as my inputs batteries :).

Then I start disconnecting things.

If I disconnect the first battery, then I notice, I still have 9v there, because the potential difference is still there.
Then I reconnect that battery, and remove the other, and I notice its still 9v.

If I disconnect both batteries, now its 0v.

Then I conclude, this is an OR gate, just by crossing 2 wires.

I can then connect up 4 batteries on one side negative, and 2 batteries on the other side positive.

But I make sure only to connect 2 of the batteries at once, because every two batteries counts as a bit, one for 1, one for 0. 9v for 1. 9v for 0.

Now I find I can connect the 1 batteries together, cross the wire, and go to the 0 battery on the positive side.

Now ive got a NOR gate. its the opposite, because of its inverted OUTPUT.

So then I then connect the 0 batteries together, cross the wire, go to the (1) positive. and because I inverted the INPUT, I now have a NAND gate.

Then I connect the 0 batteries to the 0 positive, and ive got an AND gate, but its signifying the lack of it, but not actually having it. and thats where im up to.

The other thing im missing, is getting rid of the batteries, and then making the output feed back into the input. And then I have a differential analyzer and ram.

Ram is excellent in this method, because its 2 NOR's in feedback, so theres no stuffing around and its simple to think of this way.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2015, 02:39:17 pm by ranch vermin »
A bit from here, a bit from there, and bring it together and see the whole picture.

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ranch vermin

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Re: Home made logic
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2015, 01:26:01 pm »
So I swear this works,  so on monday im off to bunnings to get some 9v batteries, some battery connectors and some wires and globes... rated for ~9v.    Im going to waste lots of batteries pluggin em in and out and just test basic logic,  thats all ill do to begin with.  The main two to test is AND and NOR.

The amazing thing, that the average ignorant man would never work out,  is im not using a transistor or switch involved, its just it goes through a mirror wiring, from the battery, to make two repeats of the input,  and the logic has to be repeated twice.

By repeating the input once, then I get Inverse input or's, the logic twice (doubling the size) then I get inverse output or's, If you connect it correctly,  then this is frozen logic finished.

Then I have to work out parallel memory that frozen logic uses,  and then I can make my video game,  and its just a whole lot of wires,  the whole thing. :)

Then I prove parallel input serial output (even tho i only have 1 battery on the output, its just if i didnt it would be serial volt delivery, which of course is undesirable.)  logic works fine,  and is completely a superior way to make any hardware.

Because who the hell wants to make tiny transistors,  when you can just get the equivilent by the repeating the cpu logic, and just do the whlole thing with conductors and insulators, and no silly semiconductors, which are a waste of time.
A bit from here, a bit from there, and bring it together and see the whole picture.

 


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