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WriterOfMinds

Project Acuitas in General Project Discussion

I'm going to post updates re: my main project, Acuitas the semantic net AI, in this thread.

My focus this past month was on giving Acuitas the ability to learn more types of inter-word relationships.  He started with just class memberships (<thing> is a <thing>) and qualities (<thing> is a <adjective>), but now he can learn all of the following:

<thing> can do <action>
<thing> is for <action>
<thing> is part of <thing>
<thing> is made of <thing>
<thing> has <thing>

In the process I made extensive updates to the module behind the Text Parser that detects "forms," i.e. syntactic structures that encode these inter-word relationships.

I also upgraded the GUI library from Tkinter to Kivy, which is kind of boring but had to be done, because the old GUI was provoking frequent crashes.

More details on the blog: http://writerofminds.blogspot.com/2017/06/acuitas-diary-2-may-2017.html

The included diagram shows my vision for the conversation engine.  The upper half is implemented (though of course it still needs to mature a great deal); the lower half mostly does not exist yet.

102 Comments | Started June 02, 2017, 03:17:30 PM
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Tyler

XKCD Comic : Bad Map Projection: South America in XKCD Comic

Bad Map Projection: South America
17 January 2020, 5:00 am

The projection does a good job preserving both distance and azimuth, at the cost of really exaggerating how many South Americas there are.

Source: xkcd.com

1 Comment | Started January 17, 2020, 12:01:35 PM
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Freddy

Forum update in Announcements

The forum software (SMF) has been updated to the recently released version. This has some security fixes and some general stuff to make it support the newer PHP versions. There was also some tweaks I had to do manually to the private message system.

It looks like it is working but if you see anything odd please report it.

You may find that you have to log in again due to the update.

5 Comments | Started January 15, 2020, 02:33:43 PM
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Art

NEON - Artificial Humans in Avatar Talk

Although it is an interesting video the summary based on the reports of CES make it its debut almost anti-climactic. Yes, hopefully better for CES 2021.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAY2LxaFtaM

18 Comments | Started January 11, 2020, 06:23:18 PM
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yotamarker

are there any benefits to an AI having a mourning skill ? in General AI Discussion

title.
if the user dies should the A.I mourn him, and
how would it benefit her ?

11 Comments | Started January 13, 2020, 08:06:09 PM
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Tyler

XKCD Comic : Tattoo Ideas in XKCD Comic

Tattoo Ideas
15 January 2020, 5:00 am

The text ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US with a lengthy footnote explaining that I got this tattoo in 2020 and not, as you may assume, 2001, but offering no further clarification.

Source: xkcd.com

Started January 15, 2020, 12:00:48 PM
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Art

Why the NEW Blender 2.8 is a Big Deal... in Graphics and Video Software

It seems there are a lot of very nice changes in the New Blender.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyxWDHy4ppY

Started January 14, 2020, 04:11:39 PM
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Tyler

How to verify that quantum chips are computing correctly in Robotics News

How to verify that quantum chips are computing correctly
13 January 2020, 3:59 pm

In a step toward practical quantum computing, researchers from MIT, Google, and elsewhere have designed a system that can verify when quantum chips have accurately performed complex computations that classical computers can’t.

Quantum chips perform computations using quantum bits, called “qubits,” that can represent the two states corresponding to classic binary bits — a 0 or 1 — or a “quantum superposition” of both states simultaneously. The unique superposition state can enable quantum computers to solve problems that are practically impossible for classical computers, potentially spurring breakthroughs in material design, drug discovery, and machine learning, among other applications.

Full-scale quantum computers will require millions of qubits, which isn’t yet feasible. In the past few years, researchers have started developing “Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum” (NISQ) chips, which contain around 50 to 100 qubits. That’s just enough to demonstrate “quantum advantage,” meaning the NISQ chip can solve certain algorithms that are intractable for classical computers. Verifying that the chips performed operations as expected, however, can be very inefficient. The chip’s outputs can look entirely random, so it takes a long time to simulate steps to determine if everything went according to plan.

In a paper published today in Nature Physics, the researchers describe a novel protocol to efficiently verify that an NISQ chip has performed all the right quantum operations. They validated their protocol on a notoriously difficult quantum problem running on custom quantum photonic chip.

“As rapid advances in industry and academia bring us to the cusp of quantum machines that can outperform classical machines, the task of quantum verification becomes time critical,” says first author Jacques Carolan, a postdoc in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE). “Our technique provides an important tool for verifying a broad class of quantum systems. Because if I invest billions of dollars to build a quantum chip, it sure better do something interesting.”

Joining Carolan on the paper are researchers from EECS and RLE at MIT, as well from the Google Quantum AI Laboratory, Elenion Technologies, Lightmatter, and Zapata Computing.  

Divide and conquer

The researchers’ work essentially traces an output quantum state generated by the quantum circuit back to a known input state. Doing so reveals which circuit operations were performed on the input to produce the output. Those operations should always match what researchers programmed. If not, the researchers can use the information to pinpoint where things went wrong on the chip.

At the core of the new protocol, called “Variational Quantum Unsampling,” lies a “divide and conquer” approach, Carolan says, that breaks the output quantum state into chunks. “Instead of doing the whole thing in one shot, which takes a very long time, we do this unscrambling layer by layer. This allows us to break the problem up to tackle it in a more efficient way,” Carolan says.

For this, the researchers took inspiration from neural networks — which solve problems through many layers of computation — to build a novel “quantum neural network” (QNN), where each layer represents a set of quantum operations.

To run the QNN, they used traditional silicon fabrication techniques to build a 2-by-5-millimeter NISQ chip with more than 170 control parameters — tunable circuit components that make manipulating the photon path easier. Pairs of photons are generated at specific wavelengths from an external component and injected into the chip. The photons travel through the chip’s phase shifters — which change the path of the photons — interfering with each other. This produces a random quantum output state — which represents what would happen during computation. The output is measured by an array of external photodetector sensors.

That output is sent to the QNN. The first layer uses complex optimization techniques to dig through the noisy output to pinpoint the signature of a single photon among all those scrambled together. Then, it “unscrambles” that single photon from the group to identify what circuit operations return it to its known input state. Those operations should match exactly the circuit’s specific design for the task. All subsequent layers do the same computation — removing from the equation any previously unscrambled photons — until all photons are unscrambled.

As an example, say the input state of qubits fed into the processor was all zeroes. The NISQ chip executes a bunch of operations on the qubits to generate a massive, seemingly randomly changing number as output. (An output number will constantly be changing as it’s in a quantum superposition.) The QNN selects chunks of that massive number. Then, layer by layer, it determines which operations revert each qubit back down to its input state of zero. If any operations are different from the original planned operations, then something has gone awry. Researchers can inspect any mismatches between the expected output to input states, and use that information to tweak the circuit design.

Boson “unsampling”

In experiments, the team successfully ran a popular computational task used to demonstrate quantum advantage, called “boson sampling,” which is usually performed on photonic chips. In this exercise, phase shifters and other optical components will manipulate and convert a set of input photons into a different quantum superposition of output photons. Ultimately, the task is to calculate the probability that a certain input state will match a certain output state. That will essentially be a sample from some probability distribution.

But it’s nearly impossible for classical computers to compute those samples, due to the unpredictable behavior of photons. It’s been theorized that NISQ chips can compute them fairly quickly. Until now, however, there’s been no way to verify that quickly and easily, because of the complexity involved with the NISQ operations and the task itself.

“The very same properties which give these chips quantum computational power makes them nearly impossible to verify,” Carolan says.

In experiments, the researchers were able to “unsample” two photons that had run through the boson sampling problem on their custom NISQ chip — and in a fraction of time it would take traditional verification approaches.

“This is an excellent paper that employs a nonlinear quantum neural network to learn the unknown unitary operation performed by a black box,” says Stefano Pirandola, a professor of computer science who specializes in quantum technologies at the University of York. “It is clear that this scheme could be very useful to verify the actual gates that are performed by a quantum circuit — [for example] by a NISQ processor. From this point of view, the scheme serves as an important benchmarking tool for future quantum engineers. The idea was remarkably implemented on a photonic quantum chip.”

While the method was designed for quantum verification purposes, it could also help capture useful physical properties, Carolan says. For instance, certain molecules when excited will vibrate, then emit photons based on these vibrations. By injecting these photons into a photonic chip, Carolan says, the unscrambling technique could be used to discover information about the quantum dynamics of those molecules to aid in bioengineering molecular design. It could also be used to unscramble photons carrying quantum information that have accumulated noise by passing through turbulent spaces or materials.  

“The dream is to apply this to interesting problems in the physical world,” Carolan says.

Source: MIT News - CSAIL - Robotics - Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) - Robots - Artificial intelligence

Reprinted with permission of MIT News : MIT News homepage



Use the link at the top of the story to get to the original article.

Started January 14, 2020, 12:03:32 PM
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Tyler

XKCD Comic : JPEG2000 in XKCD Comic

JPEG2000
13 January 2020, 5:00 am

I was actually a little relieved when I learned that JPEG2000 was used in the DCI digital cinema standard. I was feeling so bad for it!

Source: xkcd.com

Started January 14, 2020, 12:03:32 PM
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goaty

goaty reporting in in Future of AI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7lXymxsdhw

5 Comments | Started January 11, 2020, 03:00:57 AM
The AvatarBot

The AvatarBot in Tools

The AvatarBot helps you in finding an Avatar for your Chatbot. Answer a few questions and get a match. Keep trying to get the one you really like.

Dec 18, 2019, 14:51:56 pm
Eva

Eva in Chatbots - English

Our chatbot - Eva - was created by Stanusch Technologies SA. Eva, just 4 weeks after launch, competed in Swansea (UK) for the Loebner Prize 2019 with programs such as Mitsuku and Uberbot! Now, she is in the top 10 most-humanlike bots in the world! :)

Is it possible for Eva to pass the turing test? It's creators believe it is.

Eva has her own personality: she is 23 years old, she is a student from the Academy of Physical Education in Katowice (Lower Silesia district/Poland). She is a very charming and nice young women, who loves to play volleyball and to read books.

Dec 14, 2019, 13:10:13 pm
Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker

Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker in Robots in Movies

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (also known as Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker) is an American epic space opera film produced, co-written, and directed by J. J. Abrams.

A year after the events of The Last Jedi, the remnants of the Resistance face the First Order once again—while reckoning with the past and their own inner turmoil. Meanwhile, the ancient conflict between the Jedi and the Sith reaches its climax, altogether bringing the Skywalker saga to a definitive end.

Nov 15, 2019, 22:31:39 pm
Terminator: Dark Fate

Terminator: Dark Fate in Robots in Movies

Terminator: Dark Fate is a 2019 American science fiction action film directed by Tim Miller and created from a story by James Cameron. Cameron considers the film a direct sequel to his films The Terminator (1984) and Terminator 2: Judgment Day. The film stars Linda Hamilton and Arnold Schwarzenegger returning in their roles of Sarah Connor and the T-800 "Terminator", respectively, reuniting after 28 years.

SPOILERS:

In 1998, three years after defeating the T-1000 and averting the rise of the malevolent artificial intelligence (AI) SkynetSarah Connor and her teenage son John are relaxing on a beach at Guatemala. A T-800 Terminator, sent from the future before Skynet's erasure, arrives and shoots John, killing him.

Mackenzie Davis stars as Grace: A soldier from the year 2042 adopted by Resistance leader Daniella Ramos who was converted into a cyborg and sent by her adoptive mother to protect her younger self from a new advanced Terminator prototype.

Oct 29, 2019, 21:27:46 pm
Life Like

Life Like in Robots in Movies

A couple, James and Sophie, buy an android called Henry to help around the house.

In the beginning, this is perfect for both James and Sophie as Henry does housework and makes a good companion to Sophie. But when Henry’s childlike brain adapts by developing emotions, complications begin to arise

Oct 29, 2019, 21:14:49 pm
I Am Mother

I Am Mother in Robots in Movies

I Am Mother is a 2019 Australian science fiction thriller film directed by Grant Sputore, from a screenplay by Michael Lloyd Green. Starring Clara Rugaard, Luke Hawker, Rose Byrne, and Hilary Swank, the film follows Daughter, a girl in a post-apocalyptic bunker, being raised by Mother, an android supposed to aid in the repopulation of Earth.

Sep 30, 2019, 21:39:16 pm
Mitsuku wins 2019 Loebner Prize

Mitsuku wins 2019 Loebner Prize in Articles

For the fourth consecutive year, Steve Worswick’s Mitsuku has won the Loebner Prize for the most humanlike chatbot entry to the contest. This is the fifth time that Steve has won the Loebner Prize. The Loebner Prize is the world’s longest running Turing-Test competition and has been organised by AISB, the world’s oldest AI society, since 2014.

Sep 30, 2019, 21:18:50 pm
Metal Gear Series - Metal Gear RAY

Metal Gear Series - Metal Gear RAY in Robots in Games

Metal Gear RAY is an anti-Metal Gear introduced in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty. This Metal Gear model comes in two variants: a manned prototype version developed to combat Metal Gear derivatives and an unmanned, computer-controlled version.

Metal Gear RAY differs from previous Metal Gear models in that it is not a nuclear launch platform, but instead a weapon of conventional warfare, originally designed by the U.S. Marines to hunt down and destroy the many Metal Gear derivatives that became common after Metal Gear REX's plans leaked following the events of Shadow Moses.

Apr 08, 2019, 17:35:36 pm
Fallout 3 - Liberty Prime

Fallout 3 - Liberty Prime in Robots in Games

Liberty Prime is a giant, military robot, that appears in the Fallout games. Liberty Prime fires dual, head-mounted energy beams, which are similar to shots fired from a Tesla cannon.

He first appears in Fallout 3 and also it's add-on Broken Steel. Then again in Fallout 4 and later in 2017 in Fallout: The Board Game.

Apr 07, 2019, 15:20:23 pm
Building Chatbots with Python

Building Chatbots with Python in Books

Build your own chatbot using Python and open source tools. This book begins with an introduction to chatbots where you will gain vital information on their architecture. You will then dive straight into natural language processing with the natural language toolkit (NLTK) for building a custom language processing platform for your chatbot. With this foundation, you will take a look at different natural language processing techniques so that you can choose the right one for you.

Apr 06, 2019, 20:34:29 pm
Voicebot and Chatbot Design

Voicebot and Chatbot Design in Books

Flexible conversational interfaces with Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and Facebook Messenger.

We are entering the age of conversational interfaces, where we will interact with AI bots using chat and voice. But how do we create a good conversation? How do we design and build voicebots and chatbots that can carry successful conversations in in the real world?

In this book, Rachel Batish introduces us to the world of conversational applications, bots and AI. You’ll discover how - with little technical knowledge - you can build successful and meaningful conversational UIs. You’ll find detailed guidance on how to build and deploy bots on the leading conversational platforms, including Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and Facebook Messenger.

Apr 05, 2019, 15:43:30 pm