What a Badass

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LOCKSUIT

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2019, 07:30:29 am »
In my mind, nanoASI has all capabilities, all is brain, and finds new discoveries. Any part of it can become/do anything, instantly, as it is the final tech.
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goaty

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2019, 12:37:33 pm »
If we discover extraterrestrial life

"If"? Plenty of folks nowadays treat the existence of intelligent alien beings as commonplace knowledge; it's just claimed that *official* admission is being withheld from the public. The types of which I hear the most as I browse UFO-type sites are the Tall Grays, the Short Grays, the Nordics, the Pleiadians, two types of reptilians, and a praying mantis type. The following list roughly matches the frequency of which I hear those named types, so is probably a pretty well-researched list:

http://soulspottv.com/the-7-alien-species-currently-fighting-for-control-over-earth/

And yes, a few such species, especially the Nordics, are said to resemble humans so closely that those species can often intermingle with humans and not be noticed:

https://www.ibtimes.com/do-aliens-exist-yes-some-look-just-us-says-paul-hellyer-former-canadian-defense-minister-video

Telepathic aliens ruin all your privacy.

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Korrelan

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2019, 01:20:47 pm »
@Lock

Quote
You're so cute AndeyGoodey...nope.....aliens do not visit Earth.

We where here before your species climbed out of the primordial ooze.

@ Goaty

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Telepathic aliens ruin all your privacy.

We try not to make ourselves too conspicuous, and don't play with that too much... it will drop off.

 :)
It thunk... therefore it is!...    /    Project Page    /    KorrTecx Website

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LOCKSUIT

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2019, 12:46:08 am »
here is a more visual better shown one. Difficult drawing a exponential fractal on the first attempt lol.
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AndyGoode

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2019, 10:04:46 pm »
Back to the article about the rail...

A similar concept is "convergent evolution" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convergent_evolution). Wikipedia has a page on convergent evolution, but none on iterative evolution as the article discusses. It sounds like the difference is that in convergent evolution the species/phenotype never appeared earlier in either path, but in iterative evolution it did appear earlier along the same path.

I read an interesting sci fi novel, I think Arthur C. Clarke's "2061" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2061:_Odyssey_Three), where a shark was spotted in the sea of Europa, a moon of Jupiter that is known to have a water ice crust  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europa_(moon)), and the astronauts were incredulous until they remembered the principle of convergent evolution, which suggested that since the shark design was so successful on earth despite eons of evolutionary pressures, then nature would likely discover the same design via evolution on another planet. That was a great touch by a top notch author.

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Hopefully Something

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2019, 10:09:08 pm »
Makes sense.   O0

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AndyGoode

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2019, 10:27:45 pm »
So the goal that evolved them into intelligent bodies was the search for food.

Well, Lock, it's good to see you so stoked over your becoming an ultra-genius, though your train of thought is starting to lose me. Anyway, you might be interested in two related references:

(1)
A TED Talks video on intelligence being necessary only if an organism needs mobility, sort of like your insight that it was the need for food that gave rise to intelligence:

Daniel Wolpert: The real reason for brains
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7s0CpRfyYp8
TED
Published on Nov 3, 2011

(2)
Corroboration that most of science is mundane "fill in work" based on a more fundamental discovery made by some major pioneering work done by an outstanding individual in the field:

(p. 34)
   These three classes of problems--determination of significant
fact, matching of facts with theory, and articulation of theory--
exhaust, I think, the literature of normal science, both empirical
and theoretical. They do not, of course, quite exhaust the entire
literature of science. There  are also extraordinary problems, and
it may well be their resolution that makes the scientific enter-
prise as a while so particularly worthwhile. But extraordinary
problems are not to be had for the asking. They emerge only on
special occasions prepared by the advance of normal research.
Inevitably, therefore, the overwhelming majority of the prob-
lems undertaken by even the very best scientists usually fall in-
to one of the three categories outlined above. Work under the
paradigm can be conducted in no other way, and to desert the
paradigm is to cease practicing the science it defines. We shall
shortly discover that such desertions do occur. They are the
pivots about which scientific revolutions turn. But before begin-
ning the study of such revolutions, we require a more pano-
ramic view of the normal-scientific pursuits that prepare the
way.

(p. 37)
   If, however, the problems of normal science are puzzles in
this sense, we need no longer ask why scientists attack them
with such passion and devotion. A man may be attracted to
science for all sorts of reasons. Among them are the desire to
be useful, the excitement of exploring new territory, the hope
of finding order, and the drive to test established knowledge.
These motives and others besides also help to determine the
particular problems that will later engage him. Furthermore,
though the result is occasional frustration, there is good reason
(p. 38)
why motives like these should first attract him and then lead
him on. The scientific enterprise as a whole does from time to
time prove useful, open up new territory, display order, and
test long-accepted belief. Nevertheless, the individual engaged
on a normal research problem is almost never doing any one of these
things. Once engaged, his motivation is of a rather differ-
ent sort. What then challenges him is the conviction that, if
only he is skillful enough, he will succeed in solving a puzzle
that no one before has solved or solved so well. Many of the
greatest scientific minds have devoted all of their professional
attention to demanding puzzles of this sort. On most occasions
any particular field of specialization offers nothing else to do,
a fact that makes it no less fascinating to the proper sort of
addict.

Kuhn, Thomas S. 1996. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Third Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

P.S.--I'm disappointed that nobody asked me what an "inter-loka being" is. Oh well, you all lost your chance to discuss a fascinating topic.  :)
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 11:42:41 pm by AndyGoode »

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LOCKSUIT

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Re: What a Badass
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2019, 11:49:52 pm »
My main discovery was again: Cells were spawned suddenly, and begin to spread, this system spreads, so it does.

They weren't able to eat all Earth and become a huge whale of cells, rock and metal are un-edible. The cells layed on the surface and in the soil like beach bums, like dust, done heirr job.....mission unfinished. Then, suddenly, a food hunter organism gained on the rise. These started to further continue the populating where cells could not anymore. The hunters find food that cells can't on their own. This requires intelligence. These men hunters need to find food, while the woman care takers care for the offspring (growing the fetus, raising the children).

Then, these humans too dry out, the populating stops, they say to stop having too many children now today, and it HALTS once again. Then, suddenly, nanobots ASIs are invented, they can do nuclear re-arrangement and find food anywhere! All atoms and particles can be harvested.

This is a novel discovery, one of many I have made...

Next time you eat over dinner for a open ai meeting, remember you're being a food hunter discoverer.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2019, 03:33:38 am by LOCKSUIT »
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