Teen Arrested for virtual theft.

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Freddy

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Teen Arrested for virtual theft.
« on: November 15, 2007, 07:57:48 PM »
"Dutch police have arrested a teenager who stole �2,500 worth of virtual furniture from an online hotel.  Authorities said in what was the first case of its kind the 17-year-old was arrested after playing Habbo Hotel - an international game and online community with an estimated seven million members..."


http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_2599663.html
« Last Edit: March 24, 2011, 02:25:08 PM by Freddy »

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Maviarab

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Re: Teen Arrested for virtual theft.
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2007, 12:35:38 PM »
Wow interesting, good find Freddy

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ALADYBLOND

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Re: Teen Arrested for virtual theft.
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2007, 03:01:00 PM »
kids nowadays, just one inventive crime after another....he will probably end up a Bll Gates in 20 yearsand buy Habbo Hotel.
~~if i only had a brain~~

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Maviarab

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Re: Teen Arrested for virtual theft.
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2007, 12:08:18 AM »
Ok so its late here, and my meds are slowly starting to kick in, and I'm sat here on my own, listening to depressing sad music (as I often do) and I got to thinking...

I know the whole aspect of owning 'nothing' (to clarify, in my mind if something is virtual, it does not actually exist, therfore if it does not exist, it is nothing...) has been brought up before, but as I said it got me to thinking.

If something that only exists in the 'virtual' can be stolen, then it must be legally owned?

If you believe that something virtual in reality does not actually really exist, then how can it be owned?

And if something 'virtual' can be owned, and can be stolen (therefore you can be prosecuted) then it really makes me wonder exactly what in the future may fall under this umbrella of 'virtualness'.

I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts on this...

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Art

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Re: Teen Arrested for virtual theft.
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2007, 10:02:38 AM »
I think it's when someone pays or invests REAL money in or for something whether real or imagined (like an advance on a book, story or musical recording), then there is a bond between the two parties. Break it and there will be problems and those problem will most likely be more real than imagined.

Think about the music industry... if I capture / save a recording that I hear over the radio (that I purchased), from these freely floating sound waves that are all around us, I may be in violation of the law. The issue is the same, show me the music as a tangible item that I might hold in hand (no not notes on a sheet of paper). Show me where pixels that represent a character are tangible as opposed to imagined, yet people are making a killing selling "3D" props, clothing, accessories for nothing more than arranged computer code.

Again, there's money involved.

So yes, I see and understand your conundrum, but I can only offer my take on this.
Be careful...the virtual police are watching....
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